Monday, July 16, 2018

The Royal Ruins of Tikal: Day One


The Temple of the Grand Jaguar, (shown above) replicates the nine levels of the Underworld. The skeletal remains of the Lord of Chocolate were discovered inside the temple, surrounded by Jade and other precious objects.

Tikal was the greatest city in the world of the Maya - dating back to 900 BC. Today, the temples still rival the great pyramids of Egypt. Unfortunately, due to a mysterious cocktail of war, famine, overpopulation and resource depletion, the city collapsed. 

Eventually, the ruins were devoured by the jungle. In 1525, a band of conquistadors marched right by the site and didn't see a darn thing. Even today, the towering structures are tightly wrapped with hungry trees. That is one of the reasons I loved Tikal. Nature is right there, howling in your face. Or, flying by you, flashing rainbow colored feathers. The ancient city is large too - spreading out for miles. There are thousands of structures.

We didn't have the greatest weather. It was cool and cloudy - both days. Sigh. Still, I took lots of photos...



Temple of the Masks



Do you see the mask?



A ball court.



Intriguing Stelae - many inscribed with the rulers' great deeds, can be found scattered around the site.



A Brown Jay.


Ocellated Turkeys! They roam Tikal, dressed in regal feathers like a peacock. 












Look at how small the tourists look at the top of the temple.



I love this photo.





Now, we're at the top of a temple, enjoying a glorious view of the park. (You'll see this view in The Empire Strikes Back, if you look closely) Years ago, we snapped this exact shot, perched on this very ledge. We laughed because my husband still has the same shoes! 

Travelers, thanks for linking up to my new travel photo linky. It's starting to grow...


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13 comments:

DUTA said...

I was just thinking the other day about Egypt, Greece, South America; great civilizations according to archeological finds. So what has become of them now? All these nations are less than average in any respect, and economically - greatly dependant on foreign aid...

Good photos as usual!

Carol @Comfort Spring Station said...

Fascinating place!

Murthy K v v s said...

Great shots.Thanks for sharing.

Lady Fi said...

Fabulous ruins!

DJan said...

I visited these ruins more than thirty years ago and was so impressed then. Thank for taking me back for another look. :-)

Kalantikan said...

Wonderful photos you got there, however i am not familiar where Tikal is, if it is in South America might not be able to see it in this lifetime. You should also see Bagan-Myanmar, Burubudur-Indonesia, the lots of temples in Siemreap, Cambodia, etc. I enjoyed also those ruins and lots of temples. Although of course my disappointment is still not being able to see Machu Picchu.

Betty Crow said...

Wonderful pics of this very interesting place. I must say I have never thought of turkeys as being beautiful, but this one is. Enjoyed your post.

Pea bea said...

Really like the photo that you love, and I would have missed the mask so glad you pointed that out. Fun shoe photo....however not sure I could sit that high up. Thanks for sharing at Pictorial Tuesday.

Peabea from Peabea Scribbles

Molly said...

What an amazing place

Mollyx

Angie said...

It is amazing to think of the civilization that was responsible for these structures, and of nature - how quickly and effectively She can take over when man leaves! I am glad you included the shot with the tourists to give us a sense of scale - Incredible!

Spare Parts and Pics said...

Wow, and incredible lost civilization! One can only wonder about the mysterious cocktail of war, famine and overpopulation, and hope it doesn't repeat! Love the hiking boots view shot!!

Stewart M said...

What a fascinating part of the world - I'd love to visit.

Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

A Colorful World said...

I adore learning about the Maya. How I would love to visit this site!