Monday, October 17, 2016

Mayowood Mansion


The Mayo Clinic is legendary.

I've never been there. Thank goodness. But we did tour Mayowood.

 Dr. Charles H. Mayo built the 38 room Mansion in 1911. At one time, Mayowood was the center of a 3,000 acre estate near the Zumbro river. I asked the docent how the Dr. made all of his money while we toured the site. It might seem like a stupid question, but I just couldn't believe that a mansion was built, not from oil, not from railroad or timber, not from vast properties or mining, but from doctoring. I guess I always think of the old days, when doctors received a chicken or a bag of potatoes for their work. Obviously, a doctor of the caliber of the Mayo clinic, was in high demand. 

William Worrall Mayo, the founding father, arrived in Minnesota in 1863 as the surgeon examiner of the Northern Army, before the civil war.

To learn more about the Mayo father and sons click here!







My favorite part of the tour was the patina on the cellar out back!



And I was immensely intrigued by the crumbling, spooky building below the Mayowood Mansion. If I remember right, the family lived here before they built Mayowood. 

If walls could talk...

Meanwhile, Halloween month continues over at my other blog, The Chorus of the Crows  Find out what lies beneath an abandoned limestone quarry in Rochester... 


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27 comments:

Lisa @ Two Bears Farm said...

I've never been there. I like your pictures of the painted wood.

DUTA said...

I like outstanding places with family history. I've recently come upon a boutique hotel in a Bauhaus syle building which was owned by a couple of doctors who had immigrated from Europe. The owners (wife and husband) used the building as a clinic, and now the heirs renovated and turned it into a successful and unique little 4 star hotel with some 25-30 rooms.

Carol @Comfort Spring Station said...

It sounds like an interseting place to visit. I like old buildings and history.

carol l mckenna said...

Intriguing post and awesome photos ~ love the turquoise colors ~

Wishing you a happy week ~ ^_^

Photo Cache said...

Very informative post.

Worth a Thousand Words

DJan said...

The name "Mayo" only seems to go with the Clinic or something white to eat. I'll go over to see what the spooks are doing over at the Chorus. :-)

Lady Fi said...

I love that blue door.

Rhonda Albom said...

Very interesting about Dr. Mayo. I never knew anything about him or the clinic. I like your close-ups of the blue door.

theartofpuro said...

What an amazing place. Great pictures :)

Fun60 said...

Beautiful photos of that old door.

Jedidja said...

Beautiful blue door!!!

abrianna said...

That is a beautiful place.

Raquel Jiménez Lastras said...

aquí también es muy conocida la clínica mayo, muy curiosa la historia y unas grandes fotografías.
Saludios

Erica Sta said...

Interesting post!

My WednesdayAroundTheWorld
https://happy-hour-with-picts.blogspot.de/2016/10/sehen-und-gesehen-werden.html

likeschocolate said...

WOW! So beautiful!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

interesting and lovely old home. Of course I've heard of the Clinic, but never gave a thought to the family who founded it.

Jan Robinson said...

I love the look of the building beneath Mayowood. It doesn't look too crumblind or spooky for me. Loved your detailed close up photos.

Jackie and Joel Smith said...

Love your mix of close up and landscape photos! An interesting read. . .

Ruth Rieckehoff said...

Of course, I have heard about the Mayo Clinic but know nothing about its founder or his family. Glad to learn more about them thru your post. They had a very nice mansion!

Corinne Vail said...

This was so interesting, I really enjoy visiting these old estates and hearing the stories of how it all started.

Breathtaking said...

Hello!:) An interesting post about three doctors I had never heard about, and the clinic which is still an attractive building. I love all the different textures and colours in the blue door pictures.:)

Donald Urness said...

I never made it there in my time a Red Wing. I did get to te Rochester prison however when Jim Baker was there. There used toe Tammy Faye sightings in Rochester l

bettyl-NZ said...

I've never been there either, but had no idea how it got built! What a great house and grounds.

Villrose said...

Special place, and nice patina shots!

jeannettestgermain said...

The May Clinic is known world wide, and one of my friends I met in Holland has worked there. Love the several angles you took of the blue and yellow/orange contrast:) Many thanks for sharing it with ALL SEASONS!
About the contribution of your other blog - I tried to comment, but the comment section didn't open up, so I wrote my comment underneath Contact.

Ida said...

Sounds like a very interesting place. I agree with you that Patina on the old building is really wonderful.

Pat Tillett said...

It looks like an interesting place to visit. Your photos are fantastic!